Explore 150

Explore 150

 Toronto, Ontario

  • 3
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    VISITES

  • 0
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    POINTS

  • 21
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    SITES VISITÉS

    March 17, 2015
  • Digital Storytelling Contest
    Digital Storytelling Contest
    guestBook Livre d'Or The Garden of Cultures

    What does it mean to be Canadian? We pride ourselves in being a cultural mosaic; the belief thatimmigrants from all over the world, can come to Canada to share their cultural diversity for Canadians tlearn.

    I’ve always considered myself a Chinese Canadian. A blend of two unique cultures. I live in Vancouver,one of the most diverse and vibrant cities in Canada. Being born to immigrant parents has given meperspective on the hardships and barriers immigrants need to overcome to achieve the “Canadian Dream.”

    Canada is more than just about Hockey or Tim Hortons. It’s our rich history, aboriginal culture, andmulticulturalism that makes us unique. That is why I chose this picture, because the Canadian identity isn’t consisted of just one race, it is a combination of different cultures and beliefs. We Canadians prideourselves in our diverse and growing communities. As Prime Minister John Diefenbaker once said: “Canada is not a melting pot in which the individuality of each element is destroyed in order to produce a new and totally different element. It is rather a garden into which have been transplanted the hardiest and brightest flowers from many lands, each retaining in its new environment the best of the qualities for which it was loved and prized in its native land.”

    Dr. Sun Yat Sen Garden is located in the heart of Chinatown, Vancouver. The garden emulates the beautiful architectural structures of the Ming Dynasty. During this period, scholars and officials worked in their gardens enjoying the serene sounds of nature. In Dr. Sun Yat Sen’s garden there are a variety of fish species, plants and well-cut trees. In the spring, Cherry Blossoms bloom, and in the winter the smell of fresh cold air is invigorating.

    The garden was built in for the sole purpose of “maintaining and enhancing the bridge between Chinese and Western Cultures” (Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden Society of Vancouver) In order to stay true to that philosophy, 52 Chinese craftsman worked alongside Canadians to build this work of natural beauty. The mesmerizing and delicate works of traditional Chinese artwork and architecture is juxtaposed with the calm and rippling pond. This emphasizes the philosophical principles of Feng Shui. In my opinion, the garden represents the Canadian Mosaic, each and every aspect of the garden illustrates the growing diversity Canada is experiencing.

    To me, the garden was always a sacred haven for me. I vaguely remember the days when my parents were strolling around the garden telling me Chinese fables. The garden was how I connected with my roots in a new country.

    Dr. Sun Yat Sen Garden is a must-see if you ever get a chance to visit Vancouver. This is a great opportunity to learn about Chinese history while strolling around the garden, as it gives you a new perspective of live during the Ming Dynasty! It is truly a wonderful place to relax and unwind.

    Originally submitted by email by Ken, Vancouver, BC

  • March 12, 2015
  • Hôtel de ville de Calgary
    Hôtel de ville de Calgary
    guestBook Livre d'Or Renewal

    A great pride that Canadian citizens share is the Canadian national parks. These parks represent our protection of Canada's true soil and our values in maintaining Canadian heritage. The preservation of these parks allows for the environment to run its course in an entirely natural way, thus when a tragedy such as a forest fire occurs, nature restores the land's beauty with gorgeous foliage such as fire weed. This symbolizes how Canada and its citizens will continue to prosper in a positive manner regardless of the events that occur and that our Canadian identity will flourish with pride.

    Originally submitted by Maria Hughes

  • Lieu historique national du Fort-Edward
    Lieu historique national du Fort-Edward
    guestBook Livre d'Or Thank You Bev!

    This picture was taken on February 22, 2015 at the Acadia Athletic Complex in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. Coach Bev Greenlaw, an east cost Canadian basketball pioneer has coached all over the Maritimes and this image was taken at the last home game - it was also his last home game. After 7 years of coaching the Acadia University Axewomen varsity basketball team, bringing the program from the bottom up, Coach Greenlaw saw it as his time to retire in order to spend what ever time he has left with his wife and daughter. Coach Greenlaw, 65, has been a game changer in creating a youth basketball program known as the Jr. Axewomen Basketball program, in which the Acadia University team directly coaches and creates relationships with youth from kindergarten through to grade 12 high school. In this beautiful picture, Coach Greenlaw was recognized after this last CIS game with team posters that had "Thank you Bev!" printed on the back. Everyone in the bleachers and on the court rose and stood before this man holding signs to thank such a legend.

    Originally submitted by Aprille Deus

  • SGang Gwaay
    SGang Gwaay
    guestBook Livre d'Or Gwaii Haanas national park

    My roots go deep into Canadian soil. As I looked up at this
    weathered, gnarly old tree in the Gwaii Haanas national park, it struck me
    that it could represent Canadian; rooted in age-old tradition, un-phased by
    the ever-changing weather and reaching skyward to the the future and new
    growth.

    Originally submitted by Reina Fennell

  • Niagara Falls
    Niagara Falls
    guestBook Livre d'Or The Water of Acceptance

    Water is an expression, a natural element that represents the act of acceptance and life. I have gone to Niagara Falls to just simply enjoy the beautiful waterfalls and the peaceful parks that offer so much to enjoy. In this day and age life can get stressful and difficult to handle sometimes; in these times it is important to be able to have a place to simply breath, relax, and de-stress. I believe that water as an element represents the vales of Canada and its citizens. Water is accepting, nourishing, powerful, and beautiful. Canada is all of those things and more; we are accepting of all religions and cultures, all people and their experiences. But most of all we are one people on this earth just as water is one body. So am I proud and inspired to be a Canadian? Yes!

    Originally submitted by Matthew Wakem

Explore 150

Explore 150

 Toronto, Ontario
  • 0
    level icon

    NIVEAU

  • 3
    checkin icon

    VISITES

  • 0
    points icon

    POINTS

  • 21
    site-visited icon

    SITES VISITÉS

    March 17, 2015
  • Digital Storytelling Contest
    Digital Storytelling Contest
    guestBook Livre d'Or The Garden of Cultures

    What does it mean to be Canadian? We pride ourselves in being a cultural mosaic; the belief thatimmigrants from all over the world, can come to Canada to share their cultural diversity for Canadians tlearn.

    I’ve always considered myself a Chinese Canadian. A blend of two unique cultures. I live in Vancouver,one of the most diverse and vibrant cities in Canada. Being born to immigrant parents has given meperspective on the hardships and barriers immigrants need to overcome to achieve the “Canadian Dream.”

    Canada is more than just about Hockey or Tim Hortons. It’s our rich history, aboriginal culture, andmulticulturalism that makes us unique. That is why I chose this picture, because the Canadian identity isn’t consisted of just one race, it is a combination of different cultures and beliefs. We Canadians prideourselves in our diverse and growing communities. As Prime Minister John Diefenbaker once said: “Canada is not a melting pot in which the individuality of each element is destroyed in order to produce a new and totally different element. It is rather a garden into which have been transplanted the hardiest and brightest flowers from many lands, each retaining in its new environment the best of the qualities for which it was loved and prized in its native land.”

    Dr. Sun Yat Sen Garden is located in the heart of Chinatown, Vancouver. The garden emulates the beautiful architectural structures of the Ming Dynasty. During this period, scholars and officials worked in their gardens enjoying the serene sounds of nature. In Dr. Sun Yat Sen’s garden there are a variety of fish species, plants and well-cut trees. In the spring, Cherry Blossoms bloom, and in the winter the smell of fresh cold air is invigorating.

    The garden was built in for the sole purpose of “maintaining and enhancing the bridge between Chinese and Western Cultures” (Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden Society of Vancouver) In order to stay true to that philosophy, 52 Chinese craftsman worked alongside Canadians to build this work of natural beauty. The mesmerizing and delicate works of traditional Chinese artwork and architecture is juxtaposed with the calm and rippling pond. This emphasizes the philosophical principles of Feng Shui. In my opinion, the garden represents the Canadian Mosaic, each and every aspect of the garden illustrates the growing diversity Canada is experiencing.

    To me, the garden was always a sacred haven for me. I vaguely remember the days when my parents were strolling around the garden telling me Chinese fables. The garden was how I connected with my roots in a new country.

    Dr. Sun Yat Sen Garden is a must-see if you ever get a chance to visit Vancouver. This is a great opportunity to learn about Chinese history while strolling around the garden, as it gives you a new perspective of live during the Ming Dynasty! It is truly a wonderful place to relax and unwind.

    Originally submitted by email by Ken, Vancouver, BC

  • March 12, 2015
  • Hôtel de ville de Calgary
    Hôtel de ville de Calgary
    guestBook Livre d'Or Renewal

    A great pride that Canadian citizens share is the Canadian national parks. These parks represent our protection of Canada's true soil and our values in maintaining Canadian heritage. The preservation of these parks allows for the environment to run its course in an entirely natural way, thus when a tragedy such as a forest fire occurs, nature restores the land's beauty with gorgeous foliage such as fire weed. This symbolizes how Canada and its citizens will continue to prosper in a positive manner regardless of the events that occur and that our Canadian identity will flourish with pride.

    Originally submitted by Maria Hughes

  • Lieu historique national du Fort-Edward
    Lieu historique national du Fort-Edward
    guestBook Livre d'Or Thank You Bev!

    This picture was taken on February 22, 2015 at the Acadia Athletic Complex in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. Coach Bev Greenlaw, an east cost Canadian basketball pioneer has coached all over the Maritimes and this image was taken at the last home game - it was also his last home game. After 7 years of coaching the Acadia University Axewomen varsity basketball team, bringing the program from the bottom up, Coach Greenlaw saw it as his time to retire in order to spend what ever time he has left with his wife and daughter. Coach Greenlaw, 65, has been a game changer in creating a youth basketball program known as the Jr. Axewomen Basketball program, in which the Acadia University team directly coaches and creates relationships with youth from kindergarten through to grade 12 high school. In this beautiful picture, Coach Greenlaw was recognized after this last CIS game with team posters that had "Thank you Bev!" printed on the back. Everyone in the bleachers and on the court rose and stood before this man holding signs to thank such a legend.

    Originally submitted by Aprille Deus

  • SGang Gwaay
    SGang Gwaay
    guestBook Livre d'Or Gwaii Haanas national park

    My roots go deep into Canadian soil. As I looked up at this
    weathered, gnarly old tree in the Gwaii Haanas national park, it struck me
    that it could represent Canadian; rooted in age-old tradition, un-phased by
    the ever-changing weather and reaching skyward to the the future and new
    growth.

    Originally submitted by Reina Fennell

  • Niagara Falls
    Niagara Falls
    guestBook Livre d'Or The Water of Acceptance

    Water is an expression, a natural element that represents the act of acceptance and life. I have gone to Niagara Falls to just simply enjoy the beautiful waterfalls and the peaceful parks that offer so much to enjoy. In this day and age life can get stressful and difficult to handle sometimes; in these times it is important to be able to have a place to simply breath, relax, and de-stress. I believe that water as an element represents the vales of Canada and its citizens. Water is accepting, nourishing, powerful, and beautiful. Canada is all of those things and more; we are accepting of all religions and cultures, all people and their experiences. But most of all we are one people on this earth just as water is one body. So am I proud and inspired to be a Canadian? Yes!

    Originally submitted by Matthew Wakem