Wishes Across Canada

What is your wish for Canada in its next 150 years?

From national hope to a local focus, this is your opportunity to add your voice and imagination to a growing conversation. Share the changes that will build on our success to improve our communities and country.

#Wish150 is open to all during 2017. At the end of the year and throughout the year during our exhibition events, your wishes will be shared with the federal government, community organizations, fellow Canadians and citizens of the world.

Open access and an analysis of your wishes is vital in shaping and unlocking a prosperous future for all of our communities.

Latest Wishes

I wish for shared prosperity.

Anonymous

Child

Anonymous

Trying To Find The Best Diet Pill? Trying to find the best diet pill may seem like an impossible task, especially with the multitude of diet pills available for purchase. Many people purchase a diet pill only to find out that the pill makes them feel jittery, nervous, or often has no effect at all. Diet pills frequently contain the same or similar combination of ingredients and rarely contain anything new, innovative, or undiscovered to the supplement / weight loss industry. So, how can you find the best diet pill when most diet pills are made with similar ingredients? One of the most common problems associated with taking diet pills is that the person taking the diet pill is uneducated about the dosage, effects, and promises offered as they relate to each diet pill. The research at website finds that there are three factors that should be taken into consideration when deciding to take a diet pill. Dosage: It is important to take the pill exactly as recommended on the product label. Some people choose to increase the dosage thinking that the product will work faster or better. This is not the case, and many people become sick in response to the large dose. Reviewers at website often suggest that the recommended dosage be cut in half to give the body time to adjust to the stimulant in the diet pill. After the body has adjusted, it is fine to begin taking the regular dosage as recommended on the product label. Effects: The effects listed on the product label are there because these are the effects that the product has had on 'some' of the test group. Some of the diet pill testers may be fine taking the product, while others may have adverse effects. The diet pill companies print this information to educate the buyer as well as to protect themselves from lawsuits. The consumer needs to read the label and educate themselves before taking the product. Many people who are sensitive to caffeine are surprised when the diet pill makes them feel nervous or nauseous, but this information is likely printed on the product, so with a little research these affects can be avoided. Promises: If you read the fine print on product claims for diet pills and other weight loss supplements, you will see 'results not typical' printed very small somewhere where you are not expected to look. The diet pills advertised on television are responsible for some of the most outlandish claims. The results claimed in these advertisements are often unattainable within the given amount of time outlined in the ad. Don't expect to see results in two weeks like a lot of ads claim. Wouldn't it be great if you could read reviews for diet pills from actual users of each diet pill? Diet Pill Reviews website has taken the trouble out of searching for the best diet pill. You can read reviews of over 150 of the most popular diet pills available. Copyright 2006, Diet Pill Reviews [url=https://www.viagrapascherfr.com/]viagra pas cher[/url]

Anonymous

Canada ranks in the top 3 of 60 countries for hosting websites, that contain child sexual abuse. I wish that we would be able to stop all of those websites. Helping to end child sexual abuse would be something fantastic that we could do as a country. Also I wish that Canada will become a safe haven for those people who have no place to go and that our communities will be more accepting to people who are different than us. Another wish is that our garbage pollution diminishes so that our environment is able to breath and become more healthy. We need to stop global warming.

K. A in London, Ontario

I wish that Canada would totally eliminate homelessness specially for teenagers. Everyone is entitled to a roof over their heads. Projects that would protect the vulnerable from family problems, mental health issues, and drug addiction should be in place. I urge everyone, regardless of race, ethnicity, color, gender, political affiliation, and religious preferences, to unite and end poverty.

Joeherbert Cenina in Ottawa, Ontario

My wish for Canada is for Canada to focus on preserving its freshwater supplies in glaciers and the great lakes. To achieve that goal I believe that Canada should 1) reduce pollution, particularly the dumping of harmful substances into the water supply and 2) increase people' awareness about the importance of preserving water so that people would reduce the amount of water they waste.

Anonymous

My wish for Canada in the next 150 years is to enforce laws on saving resources and in particular, water. Canada has such rich water resources and we should appreciate our geographical advantage instead of taking it for granted. I hope that Canadian education can start including some of the fundamental concepts of nature, water, and human interactions. Teaching the younger generation on this concept is important. I would like to see fewer people wasting the water and resource we have and rather just take moment, go out in nature and think: "what if one day all these resources no longer exist?"; Mother Nature gave birth to us, yet we are destroying it. I hope the awareness of water and resources can be spread among Canadian citizens in the next 150 years.

Rebecca Jin in Burnaby

First, let's get a little historical perspective on American health care. This is not intended to be an exhausted look into that history but it will give us an appreciation of how the health care system and our expectations for it developed. What drove costs higher and higher? To begin, let's turn to the American civil war. In that war, dated tactics and the carnage inflicted by modern weapons of the era combined to cause ghastly results. Not generally known is that most of the deaths on both sides of that war were not the result of actual combat but to what happened after a battlefield wound was inflicted. To begin with, evacuation of the wounded moved at a snail's pace and this caused severe delays in treating the wounded. Secondly, many wounds were subjected to wound care, related surgeries and/or amputations of the affected limbs and this often resulted in the onset of massive infection. So you might survive a battle wound only to die at the hands of medical care providers who although well-intentioned, their interventions were often quite lethal. High death tolls can also be ascribed to everyday sicknesses and diseases in a time when no antibiotics existed. In total something like 600,000 deaths occurred from all causes, over 2% of the U.S. population at the time! Let's skip to the first half of the 20th century for some additional perspective and to bring us up to more modern times. After the civil war there were steady improvements in American medicine in both the understanding and treatment of certain diseases, new surgical techniques and in physician education and training. But for the most part the best that doctors could offer their patients was a "wait and see" approach. Medicine could handle bone fractures and increasingly attempt risky surgeries (now largely performed in sterile surgical environments) but medicines were not yet available to handle serious illnesses. The majority of deaths remained the result of untreatable conditions such as tuberculosis, pneumonia, scarlet fever and measles and/or related complications. Doctors were increasingly aware of heart and vascular conditions, and cancer but they had almost nothing with which to treat these conditions. This very basic review of American medical history helps us to understand that until quite recently (around the 1950's) we had virtually no technologies with which to treat serious or even minor ailments. Here is a critical point we need to understand; "nothing to treat you with means that visits to the doctor if at all were relegated to emergencies so in such a scenario costs are curtailed. The simple fact is that there was little for doctors to offer and therefore virtually nothing to drive health care spending. A second factor holding down costs was that medical treatments that were provided were paid for out-of-pocket, meaning by way of an individuals personal resources. There was no such thing as health insurance and certainly not health insurance paid by an employer. Except for the very destitute who were lucky to find their way into a charity hospital, health care costs were the responsibility of the individual. What does health care insurance have to do with health care costs? Its impact on health care costs has been, and remains to this day, absolutely enormous. When health insurance for individuals and families emerged as a means for corporations to escape wage freezes and to attract and retain employees after World War II, almost overnight a great pool of money became available to pay for health care. Money, as a result of the availability of billions of dollars from health insurance pools, encouraged an innovative America to increase medical research efforts. More Americans became insured not only through private, employer sponsored health insurance but through increased government funding that created Medicare and Medicaid (1965). In addition funding became available for expanded veterans health care benefits. Finding a cure for almost anything has consequently become very lucrative. This is also the primary reason for the vast array of treatments we have available today. I do not wish to convey that medical innovations are a bad thing. Think of the tens of millions of lives that have been saved, extended, enhanced and made more productive as a result. But with a funding source grown to its current magnitude (hundreds of billions of dollars annually) upward pressure on health care costs are inevitable. Doctor's offer and most of us demand and get access to the latest available health care technology in the form of pharmaceuticals, medical devices, diagnostic tools and surgical procedures. So the result is that there is more health care to spend our money on and until very recently most of us were insured and the costs were largely covered by a third-party (government, employers). Add an insatiable and unrealistic public demand for access and treatment and we have the "perfect storm" for higher and higher health care costs. And by and large the storm is only intensifying. At this point, let's turn to the key questions that will lead us into a review and hopefully a better understanding of the health care reform proposals in the news today. Is the current trajectory of U.S. health care spending sustainable? Can America maintain its world competitiveness when 16%, heading for 20% of our gross national product is being spent on health care? What are the other industrialized countries spending on health care and is it even close to these numbers? When we add politics and an election year to the debate, information to help us answer these questions become critical. We need to spend some effort in understanding health care and sorting out how we think about it. Properly armed we can more intelligently determine whether certain health care proposals might solve or worsen some of these problems. What can be done about the challenges? How can we as individuals contribute to the solutions? The Obama health care plan is complex for sure - I have never seen a health care plan that isn't. But through a variety of programs his plan attempts to deal with a) increasing the number of American that are covered by adequate insurance (almost 50 million are not), and b) managing costs in such a manner that quality and our access to health care is not adversely affected. Republicans seek to achieve these same basic and broad goals, but their approach is proposed as being more market driven than government driven. Let's look at what the Obama plan does to accomplish the two objectives above. Remember, by the way, that his plan was passed by congress, and begins to seriously kick-in starting in 2014. So this is the direction we are currently taking as we attempt to reform health care. Through insurance exchanges and an expansion of Medicaid,the Obama plan dramatically expands the number of Americans that will be covered by health insurance. To cover the cost of this expansion the plan requires everyone to have health insurance with a penalty to be paid if we don't comply. It will purportedly send money to the states to cover those individuals added to state-based Medicaid programs. To cover the added costs there were a number of new taxes introduced, one being a 2.5% tax on new medical technologies and another increases taxes on interest and dividend income for wealthier Americans. The Obama plan also uses concepts such as evidence-based medicine, accountable care organizations, comparative effectiveness research and reduced reimbursement to health care providers (doctors and hospitals) to control costs. The insurance mandate covered by points 1 and 2 above is a worthy goal and most industrialized countries outside of the U.S. provide "free" (paid for by rather high individual and corporate taxes) health care to most if not all of their citizens. It is important to note, however, that there are a number of restrictions for which many Americans would be culturally unprepared. Here is the primary controversial aspect of the Obama plan, the insurance mandate. The U.S. Supreme Court recently decided to hear arguments as to the constitutionality of the health insurance mandate as a result of a petition by 26 states attorney's general that congress exceeded its authority under the commerce clause of the U.S. constitution by passing this element of the plan. The problem is that if the Supreme Court should rule against the mandate, it is generally believed that the Obama plan as we know it is doomed. This is because its major goal of providing health insurance to all would be severely limited if not terminated altogether by such a decision. As you would guess, the taxes covered by point 3 above are rather unpopular with those entities and individuals that have to pay them. Medical device companies, pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, doctors and insurance companies all had to "give up" something that would either create new revenue or would reduce costs within their spheres of control. As an example, Stryker Corporation, a large medical device company, recently announced at least a 1,000 employee reduction in part to cover these new fees. This is being experienced by other medical device companies and pharmaceutical companies as well. The reduction in good paying jobs in these sectors and in the hospital sector may rise as former cost structures will have to be dealt with in order to accommodate the reduced rate of reimbursement to hospitals. Over the next ten years some estimates put the cost reductions to hospitals and physicians at half a trillion dollars and this will flow directly to and affect the companies that supply hospitals and doctors with the latest medical technologies. None of this is to say that efficiencies will not be realized by these changes or that other jobs will in turn be created but this will represent painful change for a while. It helps us to understand that health care reform does have an effect both positive and negative. Finally, the Obama plan seeks to change the way medical decisions are made. While clinical and basic research underpins almost everything done in medicine today, doctors are creatures of habit like the rest of us and their training and day-to-day experiences dictate to a great extent how they go about diagnosing and treating our conditions. Enter the concept of evidence-based medicine and comparative effectiveness research. Both of these seek to develop and utilize data bases from electronic health records and other sources to give better and more timely information and feedback to physicians as to the outcomes and costs of the treatments they are providing. There is great waste in health care today, estimated at perhaps a third of an over 2 trillion dollar health care spend annually. Imagine the savings that are possible from a reduction in unnecessary test and procedures that do not compare favorably with health care interventions that are better documented as effective. Now the Republicans and others don't generally like these ideas as they tend to characterize them as "big government control" of your and my health care. But to be fair, regardless of their political persuasions, most people who understand health care at all, know that better data for the purposes described above will be crucial to getting health care efficiencies, patient safety and costs headed in the right direction. A brief review of how Republicans and more conservative individuals think about health care reform. I believe they would agree that costs must come under control and that more, not fewer Americans should have access to health care regardless of their ability to pay. But the main difference is that these folks see market forces and competition as the way to creating the cost reductions and efficiencies we need. There are a number of ideas with regard to driving more competition among health insurance companies and health care providers (doctors and hospitals) so that the consumer would begin to drive cost down by the choices we make. This works in many sectors of our economy but this formula has shown that improvements are illusive when applied to health care. Primarily the problem is that health care choices are difficult even for those who understand it and are connected. The general population, however, is not so informed and besides we have all been brought up to "go to the doctor" when we feel it is necessary and we also have a cultural heritage that has engendered within most of us the feeling that health care is something that is just there and there really isn't any reason not to access it for whatever the reason and worse we all feel that there is nothing we can do to affect its costs to insure its availability to those with serious problems. OK, this article was not intended to be an exhaustive study as I needed to keep it short in an attempt to hold my audience's attention and to leave some room for discussing what we can do contribute mightily to solving some of the problems. First we must understand that the dollars available for health care are not limitless. Any changes that are put in place to provide better insurance coverage and access to care will cost more. And somehow we have to find the revenues to pay for these changes. At the same time we have to pay less for medical treatments and procedures and do something to restrict the availability of unproven or poorly documented treatments as we are the highest cost health care system in the world and don't necessarily have the best results in terms of longevity or avoiding chronic diseases much earlier than necessary. I believe that we need a revolutionary change in the way we think about health care, its availability, its costs and who pays for it. And if you think I am about to say we should arbitrarily and drastically reduce spending on health care you would be wrong. Here it is fellow citizens - health care spending needs to be preserved and protected for those who need it. And to free up these dollars those of us who don't need it or can delay it or avoid it need to act. First, we need to convince our politicians that this country needs sustained public education with regard to the value of preventive health strategies. This should be a top priority and it has worked to reduce the number of U.S. smokers for example. If prevention were to take hold, it is reasonable to assume that those needing health care for the myriad of life style engendered chronic diseases would decrease dramatically. Millions of Americans are experiencing these diseases far earlier than in decades past and much of this is due to poor life style choices. This change alone would free up plenty of money to handle the health care costs of those in dire need of treatment, whether due to an acute emergency or chronic condition. Let's go deeper on the first issue. Most of us refuse do something about implementing basic wellness strategies into our daily lives. We don't exercise but we offer a lot of excuses. We don't eat right but we offer a lot of excuses. We smoke and/or we drink alcohol to excess and we offer a lot of excuses as to why we can't do anything about managing these known to be destructive personal health habits. We don't take advantage of preventive health check-ups that look at blood pressure, cholesterol readings and body weight but we offer a lot of excuses. In short we neglect these things and the result is that we succumb much earlier than necessary to chronic diseases like heart problems, diabetes and high blood pressure. We wind up accessing doctors for these and more routine matters because "health care is there" and somehow we think we have no responsibility for reducing our demand on it. It is difficult for us to listen to these truths but easy to blame the sick. Maybe they should take better care of themselves! Well, that might be true or maybe they have a genetic condition and they have become among the unfortunate through absolutely no fault of their own. But the point is that you and I can implement personalized preventive disease measures as a way of dramatically improving health care access for others while reducing its costs. It is far better to be productive by doing something we can control then shifting the blame. There are a huge number of free web sites available that can steer us to a more healthful life style. A soon as you can, "Google" "preventive health care strategies", look up your local hospital's web site and you will find more than enough help to get you started. Finally, there is a lot to think about here and I have tried to outline the challenges but also the very powerful effect we could have on preserving the best of America's health care system now and into the future. I am anxious to hear from you and until then - take charge and increase your chances for good health while making sure that health care is there when we need it.

Anonymous

Is that all people in Canada regardless of where and who they are have access to the same engaging education. That first they are safe, secure, fed etc... so they can learn.

Melissa Dent in Sarnia, Ontario

I wish Canada is able to maintain the ecological diversity it currently has and to be able to be known as a nonpoluted country with great living conditions

Lilian L in Burnaby, British Columbia

My wish is for Canadian society to see the value in a plant based diet; for animals, our health and the environment.

Athena in Port Colborne, Ontario

My wish for Canada in the next 150 years is to decrease the amount of water we use. Decreasing our water usage help make it last longer for future generations.

Ehelsan in Edmonton, Alberta

My wish for Canada in its next 150 years is to have all Canadians be aware of the negative impacts of our actions on other nations, wildlife, and the environment. I wish we can take the time to reflect on our own actions instead of judging other's because that is when personal growth occurs individually and collectively.

Jolene in Edmonton

My wish for Canada in its next 150 years is to have all Canadians be aware of the negative impacts of our actions on other nations, wildlife, and the environment. I wish we can reflect on our own actions from time to time instead of judging other's because that is when personal growth occurs individually and collectively.

Anonymous

In the next 150 years, I hope that all Canadians will become aware of the impact of ocean pollution on not only marine life, but on Canada also. I wish that we work together as a country to minimize the waste we create and take more responsibility in our actions.

Kallie Huynh in Edmonton

Try to have more strict rules with people hunting, people who do poaching. Also for Mental Health some people can't afford the pills, medicine or treatment ; so they should be cheaper. For trees, we should take less and grow more since it takes years for the trees to grow.

Cielo in Edmonton, Alberta

In the next 150 years, I hope that all Canadians will become aware of the impact of ocean pollution and take the steps to minimize the ecological footprint we make.

Anonymous

My wish is that Canada will find ways to have and use clean energy more than the oil and gases that we are using now.

Sberih in Edmonton, Alberta

I wish that canada will use less water since it is a limited resource, and that everyone could have access to clean water.

Israa Abougoush in Edmonton, Alberta

My wish is to have cleaner water. Water is a supply we need in order to live. We need to somehow reduce the contamination of water in one way or another.

Anonymous in Edmonton, Alberta

That Canada starts actually listening to indigenous communities and the public. WE DON'T WANT PIPELINES! I wish that the government would respect it's promises instead of saying its going to respect indigenous communities and then approving pipelines through their land even though they say that they don't want them. I wish that Canada will stop any and all production and extraction of oil and support clean energy not dirty fossil fuels.

Paul Demke in Ottawa

I hope Canadian youth can grow up in a safer community, where we don't have to be terrified when simply walking around the neighborhood.

Anonymous in Edmonton, Alberta

Though Canada says they welcome all immigrants and refugees, it was very difficult for me to get a student visa. The immigration/work/student visa process should be made much easier for more chances and opportunities to youth around the globe.

Anonymous in Edmonton, Alberta

Water is a limited resource- once it gets contaminated, it is unusable unless it's filtered through an expensive process. We all must decrease how much we use water, to protect Earth and for the sustainable future

Anonymous in Edmonton, Alberta

We all must decrease meat consumption, especially beef, to lower the emission of methane and carbon dioxide.

Anonymous in Edmonton, Alberta

#Wish150 Events

Upcoming Events
St John's, NL
The Rooms July 12 - August 15, 2017
Whitehorse, YK
Yukon Art Centre August 4 - 26, 2017
Moncton, NB
Centre Aberdeen September 1-30, 2017
Montreal, QC
Galerie Mile End September 24 - October 8, 2017
Halifax, NS
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia September 25 - October 1, 2017
Yellowknife, NT
Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre September 2017 - February 2018
Edmonton, AB
Latitude 53 October 17-24, 2017
Charlottetown, PE
Confederation Centre for the Arts October 2017 (exact dates to be confirmed)
Iqaluit, NU
Nunatta Sunakkutaangit Museum December 2017
Past Events
Vancouver, BC
Roundhouse Community Arts & Recreation Centre July 31 - August 5, 2017
Saskatoon, SK
Paved Arts July 1-22, 2017
Toronto, ON
Artscape Youngplace March 31, 2017
Montreal, QC
McCord Museum October 25, 2016
Winnipeg, MB
Winnipeg Art Gallery October 1, 2016 - March 1, 2017