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Robarts Library, University of Toronto

Robarts Library, University of Toronto

130 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario
http://onesearch.library.utoronto.ca/library-info/ROBARTS

The John P. Robarts Research Library, commonly referred to as Robarts Library, is the main humanities and social sciences library of the University of Toronto Libraries and the largest individual library in the university. Opened in 1973 and named for John Robarts, the 17th Premier of Ontario, the library contains more than 4.5 million bookform items, 4.1 million microform items and 740,000 other items.
The library building is one of the most significant examples of brutalist architecture in North America. Its towering main structure rests on an equilateral triangular footprint and features extensive use of triangular geometric patterns throughout. It forms the main component of a three-tower complex that also includes the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library and the Claude Bissel Building, which houses the Faculty of Information.

Photo Credit: Photograph by Wikipedia user Dr.K, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Text Credit: Site description from Wikipedia, used under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

NEWS FEED
  • University Life
    guestBook Guestbook/ rlhenson/ Nov 25, 2016

    I pretty much live here during exams, pretty depressing if you spend too long here. But nice if its less than 5 hours at a time (majorly because of the lack of natural light)

  • Explore150 photoSpot Snapshot/ Malikfamily/ Mar 29, 2015
  • Explore150 photoSpot Snapshot/ mjezer/ Mar 29, 2015
  • Robarts experience as a student
    guestBook Guestbook/ CFede/ Mar 29, 2015

    Every student has a love-hate relationship with Robarts library. It's nothing personal, but when you come here to do all-nights, to study for the midterms, for the assignments, to do research, to print papers, to eat... You end up hating it a little bit ahaha but thenyou are thankfulcause without it... Youyou don't know what you would do!!

  • Explore150 photoSpot Snapshot/ CFede/ Mar 29, 2015
SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE
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Discovery Quest Discovery Quest

In 2013, the Association of Research Libraries ranked the University of Toronto library system as the third best in North America behind Yale and Harvard.

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Robarts Library, University of Toronto

Robarts Library, University of Toronto

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Site Info
Discovery Quest

In 2013, the Association of Research Libraries ranked the University of Toronto library system as the third best in North America behind Yale and Harvard.

True False
NEWS FEED
  • University Life
    guestBook Guestbook/ rlhenson/ Nov 25, 2016

    I pretty much live here during exams, pretty depressing if you spend too long here. But nice if its less than 5 hours at a time (majorly because of the lack of natural light)

  • Explore150 photoSpot Snapshot/ Malikfamily/ Mar 29, 2015
  • Explore150 photoSpot Snapshot/ mjezer/ Mar 29, 2015
  • Robarts experience as a student
    guestBook Guestbook/ CFede/ Mar 29, 2015

    Every student has a love-hate relationship with Robarts library. It's nothing personal, but when you come here to do all-nights, to study for the midterms, for the assignments, to do research, to print papers, to eat... You end up hating it a little bit ahaha but thenyou are thankfulcause without it... Youyou don't know what you would do!!

  • Explore150 photoSpot Snapshot/ CFede/ Mar 29, 2015

The John P. Robarts Research Library, commonly referred to as Robarts Library, is the main humanities and social sciences library of the University of Toronto Libraries and the largest individual library in the university. Opened in 1973 and named for John Robarts, the 17th Premier of Ontario, the library contains more than 4.5 million bookform items, 4.1 million microform items and 740,000 other items.
The library building is one of the most significant examples of brutalist architecture in North America. Its towering main structure rests on an equilateral triangular footprint and features extensive use of triangular geometric patterns throughout. It forms the main component of a three-tower complex that also includes the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library and the Claude Bissel Building, which houses the Faculty of Information.

130 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario
http://onesearch.library.utoronto.ca/library-in...
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Photo: Photograph by Wikipedia user Dr.K, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.